EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

This Special Issue of the Environmental and Planning Law Journal (EPLJ Vol 36 Part 5 ), compiled by Guest Editor, Professor Cameron Holley (UNSW Sydney and PLuS Alliance Fellow) brings together the contributions of leading environmental and energy law and governance experts to distil insights from Australia and the globe and examine the role of law in governing energy transitions, and law and governance mechanisms might be needed to better govern energy transitions and their nexus with the environment. The Introduction to this Special issue – Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus (by Cameron Holley, Amanda Kennedy, Tariro Mutongwizo and Clifford Shearing) provides a brief overview and synthesises lessons from each article featured.

Special Issue of the ALJ on Religious Freedom

The Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland held a conference on 6 April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. Selected papers from the conference are to be published in a special edition of the Australian Law Journal in September entitled “Religious Freedom”.

Underpinning China’s “Belt and Road”

Underpinning China’s “Belt and Road”

China’s “Belt and Road” initiative (BRI) describes a vast international system of trade facilitation, infrastructure development, investment, and financial integration. With over 80 countries and regions participating in it, its touchstones are interconnection among states and their co-operation for mutual benefit. Institutional support for the BRI is provided by sources such as the Asian Infrastructure ...more

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland TC Beirne School of Law, together with The Australian Law Journal, hosted “Religious Freedom after Ruddock”, a conference held on 6 April 2019.

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland Law School, in partnership with The Australian Law Journal (ALJ), will host the conference on Religious Freedom following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The event will take place at The University of Queensland, St Lucia on Saturday, 6 April 2019 from 9am to 5pm. Some papers that will be presented at the conference will be published in a special edition of the ALJ.

Conference Announcement and Call for Papers: Religious Freedom after Ruddock

A conference will be held on Saturday 6th April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The Conference is jointly organised by the Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland, and will be held at UQ in Brisbane. Selected papers from the conference will be published in a special issue of the ALJ later in 2019.

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 93 Pt 10

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 93 Pt 10

The latest Part of the Australian Law Journal contains the following articles: “Causation in Australian Securities Class Actions: Searching for an Efficient But Balanced Approach” – Michael Duffy; “Thinking Machines and Smiley Faces” – Justice Stephen Estcourt AM and Ms Karen Marr; and “The Nature of Recaption” – James O’Hara. This Part also includes the following sections: Current Issues; Conveyancing and Property; Family Law; Class Actions; Admiralty and Maritime; Recent Cases; Books Received; and Book Review.

Building and Construction Law Journal update: Vol 35 Pt 3

Building and Construction Law Journal update: Vol 35 Pt 3

The latest Part of the Building and Construction Law Journal includes this article: “Arbitration, Improving the Process” – Ian H Bailey AM SC. Also in this Part is an Editorial; and Reports on the following cases: Seymour Whyte Constructions Pty Ltd v Ostwald Bros Pty Ltd (In Liq); Structural Monitoring Systems Ltd v Tulip Bay Pty Ltd; and Ku-ring-gai Council v Ichor Constructions Pty Ltd.

Australasian Dispute Resolution Journal update: Vol 30 Pt 1

Australasian Dispute Resolution Journal update: Vol 30 Pt 1

The latest Part of the Australasian Dispute Resolution Journal includes the following articles: “Is There a Place for Restorative Justice in Civil Mediation?” – Mary Riley and Susan Douglas; “Walking the Tightrope: Exploring the Relationship between Confidentiality and Disputant Participation” – John Woodward; “Does Mandatory ADR Impact on Access to Justice and Litigation Costs?” – Ummey Sharaban Tahura; “Online Dispute Resolution in the Domain Name Space” – Alpana Roy; “UNCITRAL Convention – Mediation’s Big Bang: Can Mediation Challenge Arbitration’s Dominance?” – Sala Sihombing; “The Role of International Mediation in Data Protection and Privacy Law – Can It Be Effective?” – Sinta Dewi, Robert Walters, Bruno Zeller and Leon Trakman; and “Advanced Practice Issues for Family Dispute Resolution Practitioners” – Danielle Jaku-Greenfield, Miriam Ziegler and Nicole Ash. It also contains the following sections: Editorial: “NMC2019: Articles, Observation, and Data” – Alysoun Boyle and Dr Susan Douglas; Case Notes: “Advocate Immunity in Mediation; and Setting Aside a Mediated Settlement Agreement for Vitiating Factors” – Professor David Spencer; and Book Reviews: “Mediation Quest – Making Sense of Loss”, by Dr Katherine Pavlidis Johnson – Reviewed by Lola Akin Ojelabi.

Australian Journal of Competition and Consumer Law update: Vol 27 Pt 3

Australian Journal of Competition and Consumer Law update: Vol 27 Pt 3

The latest Part of the Australian Journal of Competition and Consumer Law includes the following articles: “Problems Associated with Joint Expert Reports for ‘Hot Tubs'” – Christopher Pleatsikas; “Cartel Class Actions in Australia: Risks vs Rewards” – Lynsey Edgar; and the following sections: Editorial; Administration and National Competition Policy; Authorisations and Notifications; Enforcement and Remedies; Case Note; Consumer Concerns; Snapshots; Economic Maters; Report from Africa; and Worth Repeating.

The Tort Law Review update: Vol 27 Pt 1

The Tort Law Review update: Vol 27 Pt 1

The latest Part of the Tort Law Review includes the following articles: “Defamation Law Reform in Australia: The Multiple Publication Rule” – Anthony Gray; “The Liability of Search Engines and Tech Companies in Defamation Law” – Anthony Gray; Medical Professionals and the Erosion of the ‘Ordinary’ Practitioner Standard” – Carolyn Sappideen; and “Distinguishing Duties of Care of Sports Coaches in a UK Context” – Neil Partington.