Curing a Multitude of Sins

Curing a Multitude of Sins

With millions of Australians participating in them, and with the associations themselves numbering in the hundreds of thousands, unincorporated associations truly are social entities. They variously include sports clubs, charities, cultural and arts and environmental organisations, and churches.[1] “The vast majority of Australians participate in unincorporated associations,” says Matthew Turnour in “Should Australians Have a ...more

Coming to the ALJ in April

The admissibility of propensity evidence has become an area of notorious difficulty. This was highlighted by the work of the McClellan Royal Commission in the context of the low rate of convictions in relation to alleged child sexual offences, where such evidence can play a decisive role in what might otherwise be a “word against word” case.

Modern Slavery, Climate Change, and One Big Elephant

Modern Slavery, Climate Change, and One Big Elephant

Over 40 million people are living and working as slaves in the world today.[1] It is a staggering figure. It is outrageous! In the current issue of the Company and Securities Law Journal (C&SLJ), Vol 37 No 2, Justine Nolan and Nana Frishling argue that globalisation has spurred the growth of modern slavery (including servitude, ...more

A Letter from The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG

We have received the following letter from The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG in response to the September issue of the Australian Law Journal.

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

This Special Issue of the Environmental and Planning Law Journal (EPLJ Vol 36 Part 5 ), compiled by Guest Editor, Professor Cameron Holley (UNSW Sydney and PLuS Alliance Fellow) brings together the contributions of leading environmental and energy law and governance experts to distil insights from Australia and the globe and examine the role of law in governing energy transitions, and law and governance mechanisms might be needed to better govern energy transitions and their nexus with the environment. The Introduction to this Special issue – Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus (by Cameron Holley, Amanda Kennedy, Tariro Mutongwizo and Clifford Shearing) provides a brief overview and synthesises lessons from each article featured.

Special Issue of the ALJ on Religious Freedom

The Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland held a conference on 6 April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. Selected papers from the conference are to be published in a special edition of the Australian Law Journal in September entitled “Religious Freedom”.

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland TC Beirne School of Law, together with The Australian Law Journal, hosted “Religious Freedom after Ruddock”, a conference held on 6 April 2019.

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland Law School, in partnership with The Australian Law Journal (ALJ), will host the conference on Religious Freedom following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The event will take place at The University of Queensland, St Lucia on Saturday, 6 April 2019 from 9am to 5pm. Some papers that will be presented at the conference will be published in a special edition of the ALJ.

Conference Announcement and Call for Papers: Religious Freedom after Ruddock

A conference will be held on Saturday 6th April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The Conference is jointly organised by the Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland, and will be held at UQ in Brisbane. Selected papers from the conference will be published in a special issue of the ALJ later in 2019.

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 94 Pt 5

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 94 Pt 5

The latest Part of the Australian Law Journal contains the following articles: “Dixonian Legalism and its Adherents: Assessing the Place for Policy Choices under “Strict and Complete Legalism” in Theory and Practice” – Ned Hirst; “Discrimination Against Employees of Religious Schools in Australia, US and the EU – A Comparison in Light of Human Rights and Deliberative Democracy” – Robert Mężyk; and “Resolving Conflicts at the Interface of Public and Private Law” – Ellen Roc. This Part also includes the following sections: Current Issues; Conveyancing and Property; Environmental Law; International Focus; and Obituary: The Hon John Cain.

Journal of Banking and Finance Law and Practice update: Vol 31 Pt 1

Journal of Banking and Finance Law and Practice update: Vol 31 Pt 1

The latest Part of the Journal of Banking and Finance Law and Practice includes the following articles: “Mortgage Broking, Regulatory Failure and Statutory Design” – Jeannie Marie Paterson and Elise Bant; “Consumer Lending by New Zealand Banks After the Royal Commission – Business as Usual or More Responsibility Required?” – Victoria Stace; “Prudential Regulation in Australia and the Banking Royal Commission: A Missed Opportunity for Reform?” – Steve Kourabas; “Regulating Superannuation in the Shadows of the Twin Peaks” – M Scott Donald; “Role and Effectiveness of ASIC Compared with the SEC: Shedding Light on Regulation and Enforcement in the United States and Australia” – Zehra G Kavame Eroglu and KE Powell; “Product Intervention Power: An Extra Layer of Protection to Consumers” – Marina Nehme; and “Trust, Social Licence and Regulation: Lessons from the Hayne Royal Commission” – Anne Matthew. Also in this Part are the following Sections: Foreword; Insolvency Law and Management; and United States.

Journal of Civil Litigation and Practice update: Vol 8 Pt 4

Journal of Civil Litigation and Practice update: Vol 8 Pt 4

The latest Part of the Journal of Civil Litigation and Practice includes the following articles: “Litigation Funding of Class Actions Approved in Queensland while Maintenance and Champerty Remain the Law” – Wayne Attrill; and “Documents Within Reach: Discovery Powers”” – Alexander Sloan. Also in this Part are the following sections: Editorial Comments on “Lawyers to Be Able to Take Percentage of Class Action Damages in Victoria but Questions Remain” – Michael Legg and “”People Who Live in Glass Houses”: Fearn v Tate Gallery Board of Trustees” – Roderick Joyce, QSO, QC; and Case Notes: “The End of the Chorley Exception in Australia: Bell Lawyers Pty Ltd v Pentelow” – Benjamin Teng and “Craig v Williams: Allegations of Apparent Bias” – Matthew Mortimer.

Journal of Judicial Administration update: Vol 29 Pt 3

Journal of Judicial Administration update: Vol 29 Pt 3

The latest Part of the Journal of Judicial Administration includes the following articles: “Single Joint Expert Witnesses” – Ian Freckelton QC; “Court Delay and Judicial Wellbeing: Lessons from Self-Determination Theory to Enhance Court Timeliness in Australia” – Sarah Murray, Ian Murray and Tamara Tulich; “A Tale of Two Courts” – Felicity Bell; and “Implications of the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Abuse for the Protection of Vulnerable Witnesses: Royal Commission Procedures and Introduction of Intermediaries and Ground Rules Hearings around Australia” – Anita Mackay and Jacqueline Giuffrida.

Journal of Banking and Finance Law and Practice update: Vol 30 Pt 4

Journal of Banking and Finance Law and Practice update: Vol 30 Pt 4

The latest Part of the Journal of Banking and Finance Law and Practice includes the following articles: “Romalpa Suppliers and the PPSA – For Better or Worse in Insolvency – Part II” – David Morrison and Matthew Broderick; “Cut Me Some Slack: An Analysis into the Extension of Time Provisions for Registering Security Interests under the Corporations Act” – Amanda Jade Staninovski; “The Trustee’s Indemnity as “Property of the Company” under the Corporations Act 2001 (Cth): Carter Holt Harvey Woodproducts Australia Pty Ltd v Commonwealth” – Allison J Silink; “Finance v2.0 – an Analysis of the Impact of Blockchain, Smart Contracts and Extensible Markup Language on Debt Capital Markets in Australia” – Andrew J Lunardi; “Disclaimer Explainer: What Are the Legal Consequences of Disclaimer of Real Property under s 133 of the Bankruptcy Act 1966 (Cth)?” – Matthew Paterson; and “The Regulation of Cryptoassets in Australia and the United States” – David Lu. Also in this Part are the following Sections: Securities and Mortgages; Wealth Management; and United Kingdom and Europe.