Modern Slavery, Climate Change, and One Big Elephant

Modern Slavery, Climate Change, and One Big Elephant

Over 40 million people are living and working as slaves in the world today.[1] It is a staggering figure. It is outrageous! In the current issue of the Company and Securities Law Journal (C&SLJ), Vol 37 No 2, Justine Nolan and Nana Frishling argue that globalisation has spurred the growth of modern slavery (including servitude, ...more

A Letter from The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG

We have received the following letter from The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG in response to the September issue of the Australian Law Journal.

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

This Special Issue of the Environmental and Planning Law Journal (EPLJ Vol 36 Part 5 ), compiled by Guest Editor, Professor Cameron Holley (UNSW Sydney and PLuS Alliance Fellow) brings together the contributions of leading environmental and energy law and governance experts to distil insights from Australia and the globe and examine the role of law in governing energy transitions, and law and governance mechanisms might be needed to better govern energy transitions and their nexus with the environment. The Introduction to this Special issue – Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus (by Cameron Holley, Amanda Kennedy, Tariro Mutongwizo and Clifford Shearing) provides a brief overview and synthesises lessons from each article featured.

Special Issue of the ALJ on Religious Freedom

The Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland held a conference on 6 April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. Selected papers from the conference are to be published in a special edition of the Australian Law Journal in September entitled “Religious Freedom”.

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland TC Beirne School of Law, together with The Australian Law Journal, hosted “Religious Freedom after Ruddock”, a conference held on 6 April 2019.

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland Law School, in partnership with The Australian Law Journal (ALJ), will host the conference on Religious Freedom following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The event will take place at The University of Queensland, St Lucia on Saturday, 6 April 2019 from 9am to 5pm. Some papers that will be presented at the conference will be published in a special edition of the ALJ.

Conference Announcement and Call for Papers: Religious Freedom after Ruddock

A conference will be held on Saturday 6th April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The Conference is jointly organised by the Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland, and will be held at UQ in Brisbane. Selected papers from the conference will be published in a special issue of the ALJ later in 2019.

Australian Tax Review update: Vol 48 Pt 4

Australian Tax Review update: Vol 48 Pt 4

The latest Part of the Australian Tax Review includes an Editorial, and the following articles: “Australia’s System for Relieving Foreign Source Income from Double Taxation: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow” – The Hon Richard Edmonds AM SC; and “Digitalisation and Broadcasting: Evaluating the Application of Royalty Withholding Tax to Digitalised Business Models” – Celeste M Black.

Environmental and Planning Law Journal update: Vol 37 Pt 1 (Special Issue)

Environmental and Planning Law Journal update: Vol 37 Pt 1 (Special Issue)

This Special Issue of the Environmental and Planning Law Journal includes the following articles: “Corporations and Climate Change: An Investigation of Mandatory Climate Risk Disclosure in Australia” – Zoe Caldwell; “Victorian Ecological Sustainable Forest Management: Part VI – Identifying Change Mechanisms in Regulation and a New Model for Victorian Forestry Practice” – Dr Rhett Martin; “Identifying Opportunities for Climate Litigation: A Transnational Claim by Customary Landowners in Papua New Guinea against Australia’s Largest Climate Polluter” – Dr Chris McGrath; “Litigating at the Source: Attributing Climate Change Impacts to Coal Mines” – Kierra Parker; “Coal and Climate Change: A Study of Contemporary Climate Litigation in Australia” – Victoria McGinness and Murray Raff; and “Coastal Management and Protecting the Public Interest: Recent NSW Land and Environment Court Decisions” – Ballanda Sack, Timothy Allen and Bruce Thom.

Criminal Law Journal update: Vol 43 Pt 5

Criminal Law Journal update: Vol 43 Pt 5

The latest Part of the Criminal Law Journal includes the following articles: “A Case for Systemic Design in Criminal Law Techno-Regulation” – Brendan Walker-Munro; “Vulnerable Witnesses and Victoria’s Intermediary Pilot Program” – Natalia Antolak-Saper and Hannah MacPherson; and “The New Northern Territory ICAC: Better Corruption Offences, but Prevented by a Lack of Prevention” – Neil Samuel Hope, Dane Bryce Weber and Maija-Ilona Wilhelmiina Pekkanen. Also in this Part is an Editorial on a new right of appeal as a response to wrongful convictions; Sentencing Review 2018-2019; and a Digest of Criminal Law Cases.

The Queensland Lawyer update: Vol 38 Pt 3

The Queensland Lawyer update: Vol 38 Pt 3

The latest Part of The Queensland Lawyer includes the following content: “Management Rights Agreements for Body Corporates in Queensland: Must They Expire, or May They Be “Topped Up” Indefinitely?” – Neil Samuel Hope, Dane Bryce Weber and Maija-Ilona Wilhelmiina Pekkanen; “Amendments to the Small Business Capital Gains Concessions” – Francesco Maconi; and the following Sections: Editorial; Commercial Law: “Assessment of Damages for Loss of Use of a Non-profit Earning Chattel on Breach of a Contract for the Sale of Goods: Rider v Pix [2019] QCA 182” – Clive Turner; Conveyancing and Property Law: “Musical Chairs and Good Faith Limitations upon Contractual Notice” – Dr Bill Dixon; Criminal Law: “Climate Mayhem” – A M West; Industrial Law: “Foreseeability of Risk: Deans v Maryborough Christian Education Foundation Ltd” – Kristy Richardson; and Book Reviews.

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 94 Pt 1

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 94 Pt 1

The latest Part of the Australian Law Journal contains the following articles: “An Australian International Commercial Court – Not A Bad Idea Or What A Bad Idea?” – The Hon Justice A S Bell; “Australia’s “Abhorrent Violent Material” Law: Shouting “Nerd Harder” And Drowning Out Speech” – Evelyn Douek; and “Rituals Of Engagement: What Happens To The Ring When An Engagement Is Called Off?” – James Duffy, Elizabeth Dickson and John O’Brien. This Part also includes the following sections: Current Issues; Family Law, International Focus, Around the Nation: Victoria; Book Review; and Obituary.