Curing a Multitude of Sins

Curing a Multitude of Sins

With millions of Australians participating in them, and with the associations themselves numbering in the hundreds of thousands, unincorporated associations truly are social entities. They variously include sports clubs, charities, cultural and arts and environmental organisations, and churches.[1] “The vast majority of Australians participate in unincorporated associations,” says Matthew Turnour in “Should Australians Have a ...more

Coming to the ALJ in April

The admissibility of propensity evidence has become an area of notorious difficulty. This was highlighted by the work of the McClellan Royal Commission in the context of the low rate of convictions in relation to alleged child sexual offences, where such evidence can play a decisive role in what might otherwise be a “word against word” case.

Modern Slavery, Climate Change, and One Big Elephant

Modern Slavery, Climate Change, and One Big Elephant

Over 40 million people are living and working as slaves in the world today.[1] It is a staggering figure. It is outrageous! In the current issue of the Company and Securities Law Journal (C&SLJ), Vol 37 No 2, Justine Nolan and Nana Frishling argue that globalisation has spurred the growth of modern slavery (including servitude, ...more

A Letter from The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG

We have received the following letter from The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG in response to the September issue of the Australian Law Journal.

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

This Special Issue of the Environmental and Planning Law Journal (EPLJ Vol 36 Part 5 ), compiled by Guest Editor, Professor Cameron Holley (UNSW Sydney and PLuS Alliance Fellow) brings together the contributions of leading environmental and energy law and governance experts to distil insights from Australia and the globe and examine the role of law in governing energy transitions, and law and governance mechanisms might be needed to better govern energy transitions and their nexus with the environment. The Introduction to this Special issue – Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus (by Cameron Holley, Amanda Kennedy, Tariro Mutongwizo and Clifford Shearing) provides a brief overview and synthesises lessons from each article featured.

Special Issue of the ALJ on Religious Freedom

The Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland held a conference on 6 April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. Selected papers from the conference are to be published in a special edition of the Australian Law Journal in September entitled “Religious Freedom”.

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland TC Beirne School of Law, together with The Australian Law Journal, hosted “Religious Freedom after Ruddock”, a conference held on 6 April 2019.

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland Law School, in partnership with The Australian Law Journal (ALJ), will host the conference on Religious Freedom following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The event will take place at The University of Queensland, St Lucia on Saturday, 6 April 2019 from 9am to 5pm. Some papers that will be presented at the conference will be published in a special edition of the ALJ.

Conference Announcement and Call for Papers: Religious Freedom after Ruddock

A conference will be held on Saturday 6th April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The Conference is jointly organised by the Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland, and will be held at UQ in Brisbane. Selected papers from the conference will be published in a special issue of the ALJ later in 2019.

Australian Business Law Review update: Vol 48 Pt 1

Australian Business Law Review update: Vol 48 Pt 1

The latest Part of the Australian Business Law Review includes the following articles: “The “Safe Harbour” Reform of Directors’ Insolvent Trading Liability in Australia: Insolvency Professionals’ Views” – Ian Ramsay and Stacey Steele; “To Bar Order, or Not to Bar Order: Facilitating Settlement in Australian Anti-Cartel Class Actions” – Bethany Moore; “Reforming Private Whistleblower Protections – What Next in Australia?” – David A Chaikin; and “Financial Reporting and Disclosure of Intangible and Intellectual Property Assets by Australian Listed Entities Between 2004 and 2018” – Tony Ciro and Bülend Terzioglu. Also in this Part are the following sections: Editorial by Michael Terceiro; Consumer Protection: “Making Liars of Us All!” – Ian Tonking SC; and Commercial Litigation: “In-house Counsel, the Requirement of Independence and Legal Professional Privilege – Martin v Norton Rose Fulbright Australia (No 2) [2019] FCA 96” – Michael Legg.

Australian Tax Review update: Vol 49 Pt 1

Australian Tax Review update: Vol 49 Pt 1

The latest Part of the Australian Tax Review includes an Editorial, and the following articles: “Taxpayer Attitudinal Responses to Tax Audits – Strategic Implications of Recent Findings from the United States” – John Bevacqua; “Preventing Pension Double Taxation: The Treatment of Australian Superannuation Guarantee under the Existing Australia-US Tax Treaty” – KE Powell; and “When Is There an “Adventure or Concern in the Nature of Trade” for GST Purposes?” – Rami Hanegbi.

Insolvency Law Journal update: Vol 28 Pt 1

Insolvency Law Journal update: Vol 28 Pt 1

The latest Part of the Journal includes the following articles: “Special Administration of Indigenous Corporations under the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act 2006 (Cth): Recent Reviews and Proposed Reforms” – Mary Wyburn; “The Effect of Bankruptcy and Liquidation on Trust Property: Recent High Court Judgments and Implications for Insolvency Practitioners and “Post-Appointment” Dealings and Dispositions” – Mark Wellard; and the following sections: Editorial – Dr David Morrison; Recent Developments: “Vesting of Trust Property in a Bankruptcy Trustee and “Reasonable Grounds” for Lodging a Caveat: Some Helpful Guidance from the High Court” – Garry J Hamilton; and Report from New Zealand: “New Zealand’s New Co-regulatory Scheme for Insolvency Practitioners” – Lynne Taylor.

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 94 Pt 6

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 94 Pt 6

The latest Part of the Australian Law Journal contains the following articles: “Regulating Forensic Science And Medicine Evidence At Trial: It’s Time For A Wall, A Gate And Some Gatekeeping” – Gary Edmond; “Detouring “Business As Usual”: Alternative Pathways Through The Australian Legal System For Individuals And Communities Seeking Action On Climate Change” – Jordan Elliott and Amy Maguire; and “The First 24 Years Of The Victorian Court Of Appeal In Crime” – Gavin Silbert QC. This Part also includes the following sections: Current Issues; Corporations and Securities; Family Law; International Focus; and Books Received.

Australian Journal of Competition and Consumer Law update: Vol 28 Pt 2

Australian Journal of Competition and Consumer Law update: Vol 28 Pt 2

The latest Part of the Australian Journal of Competition and Consumer Law includes the following articles: “Online Auctions Going! Going! Gone! Sold by the Person Engaging in Misleading or Deceptive Conduct!!!” – Adrian Coorey; “Increased Civil Pecuniary Penalties – The “Cost of Doing Business” or an Effective Deterrent?” – Cam H Truong QC and Luisa F Alampi; “Why the Doctrine of Penalty Cannot Make Australian Unused and Expired Gift Cards Refundable?” – Dr Wei Wen; and the following sections: Editorial; Access to Services; Consumer Protection; Tribunal Tableaux; Case Note; Consumer Concerns; Report from Latin America; and Odds and Ends.