On the Capitalisation of Knowledge

Workplace Review is nothing if not broad in its coverage of work. In its current issue, Vol 10 No 3, David Nikolas Brodsky compares academic studies from the discipline of organisational behaviour, and is led to consider the ways in which knowledge itself is gained and organised. Bedevilled by all manner of “inherent weaknesses” including ...more

ALRC's Financial Services Law Mapping Project

ALRC’s Financial Services Law Mapping Project

In the latter part of 2020, the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) was tasked by the Federal Government to review the legislative framework for corporations and financial services regulation, with a view to ensuring, “within … existing policy settings”, that framework is “adaptive, efficient and navigable”. For the Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, ...more

JOURNAL OF CIVIL LITIGATION AND PRACTICE

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS for Special Issue on the 10th Anniversary of the Victorian Civil Procedure Act 2010

The Civil Procedure Act 2010 (Vic) was enacted 10 years ago and commenced operation on 1 January 2011.  It was an Act aimed at reforming and modernising the laws, practice, procedure and culture for the resolution of civil disputes in Victoria. The Editors invite submissions on the ground-breaking reforms encapsulated in the State of Victoria’s Civil Procedure Act.

Special issue on COVID-19 published in the Journal of Law and Medicine

Special issue on COVID-19 published in the Journal of Law and Medicine

Thomson Reuters is pleased to publish a special issue of the Journal of Law and Medicine on issues relating to COVID-19. It incorporates international perspectives, including from Brazil, Canada, Russia and New Zealand, as well as from Australia. The Journal carries an important multi-disciplinary review (by Mendelson et al) of issues arising from the use ...more

Coming to the ALJ in April

The admissibility of propensity evidence has become an area of notorious difficulty. This was highlighted by the work of the McClellan Royal Commission in the context of the low rate of convictions in relation to alleged child sexual offences, where such evidence can play a decisive role in what might otherwise be a “word against word” case.

Modern Slavery, Climate Change, and One Big Elephant

Modern Slavery, Climate Change, and One Big Elephant

Over 40 million people are living and working as slaves in the world today.[1] It is a staggering figure. It is outrageous! In the current issue of the Company and Securities Law Journal (C&SLJ), Vol 37 No 2, Justine Nolan and Nana Frishling argue that globalisation has spurred the growth of modern slavery (including servitude, ...more

A Letter from The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG

We have received the following letter from The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG in response to the September issue of the Australian Law Journal.

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

EPLJ Special Issue on Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus

This Special Issue of the Environmental and Planning Law Journal (EPLJ Vol 36 Part 5 ), compiled by Guest Editor, Professor Cameron Holley (UNSW Sydney and PLuS Alliance Fellow) brings together the contributions of leading environmental and energy law and governance experts to distil insights from Australia and the globe and examine the role of law in governing energy transitions, and law and governance mechanisms might be needed to better govern energy transitions and their nexus with the environment. The Introduction to this Special issue – Governing Energy Transitions: Unconventional Gas, Renewables and their Environmental Nexus (by Cameron Holley, Amanda Kennedy, Tariro Mutongwizo and Clifford Shearing) provides a brief overview and synthesises lessons from each article featured.

Special Issue of the ALJ on Religious Freedom

The Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland held a conference on 6 April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. Selected papers from the conference are to be published in a special edition of the Australian Law Journal in September entitled “Religious Freedom”.

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Conference on Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland TC Beirne School of Law, together with The Australian Law Journal, hosted “Religious Freedom after Ruddock”, a conference held on 6 April 2019.

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

Religious Freedom after Ruddock

The University of Queensland Law School, in partnership with The Australian Law Journal (ALJ), will host the conference on Religious Freedom following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The event will take place at The University of Queensland, St Lucia on Saturday, 6 April 2019 from 9am to 5pm. Some papers that will be presented at the conference will be published in a special edition of the ALJ.

Conference Announcement and Call for Papers: Religious Freedom after Ruddock

A conference will be held on Saturday 6th April 2019 to consider the future of religious freedom in Australia following the report of the Religious Freedom Review, led by former Attorney-General Philip Ruddock. The Conference is jointly organised by the Australian Law Journal and the TC Beirne School of Law at the University of Queensland, and will be held at UQ in Brisbane. Selected papers from the conference will be published in a special issue of the ALJ later in 2019.

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 95 Pt 11

Australian Law Journal update: Vol 95 Pt 11

The latest Part of the Australian Law Journal contains the following articles: “Navigating a New Terrain: Developing Autonomous Vehicle Liability Pathways in Australia in Light of International Experience” – Lilla Thiele-Evans, Blake Pepper, John Zeleznikow, Neil Foster and Tania Sourdin; “The Impact of a New and Widespread Contagious Disease on Pre-existing Contractual Obligations” – Tom Allchurch; and “Is the Coronavirus the End of All Contracts?” – Natalie Ngo.

This Part also includes the following sections: Current Issues: “Some Recent Developments”; “Can Australia Still Call Itself a Liberal Democracy?”; “Can Employers Mandate Vaccinations?”; “The COVID-era and Australian Federation: State Power Rises, Old Faultlines Revealed”; “National Security Legislation and Parliamentary Oversight”; and “The Curated Page”; Around the Nation: Western Australia: “Resolution of a Cold Case?”; Environmental Law: “Quartet of Recent Landmark Climate Change Cases”; Statutory Interpretation: “‘Always Speaking’ Statutes”; Book Reviews: “The Chronicle of a Young Lawyer: A Legal Journey in the Territory of Papua and New Guinea”, by Kerry Dillon; and “Frontiers of Public Law”, edited by Jason NE Varuhas and Shona Wilson Stark; and Obituary: Judge James Crawford (1948–2021).

Public Law Review update: Vol 32 Pt 3

Public Law Review update: Vol 32 Pt 3

The latest Part of the Public Law Review contains the following articles: “Structured Proportionality, Unreasonableness and Managing the Line between Executive and Judicial Functions” – Andrew Edgar; “The Relationship between Federalism and Rights during COVID-19” – Scott Stephenson; and “The Interpretation and Application of Section 55 of the Constitution” – Anne Twomey.

This Part also includes the following sections: Comments: “The Value of Reported Arguments in the Study and Application of Case Law” – The Hon William Gummow AC and Harry Sanderson; “Drawing an Implied Limitation to the Race Power” – Harry Hobbs; and “D v New Zealand Police: A Comment on Rights-consistent Statutory Interpretation in New Zealand” – Edward Willis; Speech: “‘The First Task Is to Find the Right Answer’: Public Service and the Decline of Capability” – Glyn Davis AC; Book Review: “Burrows and Carter Statute Law in New Zealand”, by Ross Carter – Reviewed by KH Newman; and Developments.

Australian Intellectual Property Journal update: Vol 32 Pt 1

Australian Intellectual Property Journal update: Vol 32 Pt 1

The latest Part of the Australian Intellectual Property Journal includes an Editorial by David Lindsay as well as the following articles: “Related Rights of Press Publishers and Their Limitations under the EU Directive on Copyright in the Digital Single Market” – Elżbieta Czarny-Drożdżejko; “Onus, Presumptions and Registrability under New Zealand Trade Mark Law” – Rob Batty; and “Contracting Out, Fair Dealing, and Public Policy: The Australian Perspective” – Alexander Sloan and Lucy Cradduck.

Australian Tax Review update: Vol 50 Pt 2

Australian Tax Review update: Vol 50 Pt 2

The latest Part of the Australian Tax Review includes the following articles: “COVID-19 and Childcare Expense Deductions: Revisiting the Decision in Lodge” – Lydia Thiagarajah and Amanda Darshini Selvarajah; “COVID-19 Responses and the Contemplative Worker’s Home Occupancy Expense Claim” – Elizabeth F Morton, Michael F Curran and Sarah A Hinchliffe; “Ambiguous Doctrines and Legislative Responses to Current/Capital Expenditure” – Christina Allen; and “Stretching the Concept of Charity in the Tax Context: Membership-based Entities as Charities” – Ann O’Connell. Also in this Part are the following sections: Editorial: “Responding to the Continuing Challenges of COVID-19”; Case Note: “The Commissioner of Taxation’s Power to Require the Production of Information and Challenge Claims of Legal Professional Privilege” – Ram Pandey and Michael Legg; and Book Review: “The Allocation of Multinational Business Income: Reassessing the Formulary Apportionment Option”, by Richard Krever and François Vaillancourt (eds) – Reviewed by John Azzi.

Criminal Law Journal update: Vol 45 Pt 4

Criminal Law Journal update: Vol 45 Pt 4

The latest Part of the Criminal Law Journal includes the following articles: “Legal Aid Commission of New South Wales: Aiding the Individual, the Nation and the Institutions” – The Hon Justice Michelle Gordon AC; “Criminalising ‘Wage Theft’ in Australia: Property, Stealing, and Other Concepts” – Joachim Dietrich and Matthew Raj; and “Myths, Misconceptions and Mixed Messages: An Early Look at the New Tendency and Coincidence Evidence Provisions” – David Hamer.

Also in this Part is an Editorial: “The Questionable Legitimacy of the Criminal Law as the Front Line of Defence against COVID-19: Long-term Implications”; Comment: “Overcoming Password Protection and Encryption of Smart Phones and Computers to Facilitate the Execution of Commonwealth Search Warrants – s 3LA of the Crimes Act 1914 (Cth)” – Michael Legg and Stephanie Crosbie; and Digest of Criminal Law Cases.